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  • SVCCC Foundation

    Full
  • Swiss Liaison Centre Committee for the Victims of Crime Act (SVK-OHG)

    Associate

    c/o Swiss Conference of Cantonal Ministers of Social Affairs, Speichergasse 6 Postfach 3000 Berne 7

    (+41) 31 320 29 99

    Veronika.Neruda@sodk.ch

    http://www.sodk.ch/

    Members

  • V-Europe

    Associate

    V-Europe was created by victims of the attacks of 22 march 2016 in Brussels, to get united and to progress for a better future.

    The association explained in a nutshell by the letter “V” of V-Europe :

    Victims: getting to know each other, share our experiences and determine our needs.
    Values: to expose and defend our interests and values.
    Veritas: to act for the manifestation of the truth and to understand everything that has happened.
    Victory: our experiences are unique. Let’s give them a sense and make them contribute to a better society, including on the legal and administrative levels. Together we can make a difference. Be it for us, future victims that we hope will never come and ordinary citizens.

  • Victim Aid Denmark (Hjælp Voldsofre)

    Associate

    Leaflet in Danish

    Members

  • Victim Support England & Wales

    Full

    Victim Support England and Wales supports victims of crime throughout the country. The Organisation has a national infrastructure and receives most of its referrals from the police – using a secure IT system (this is a unique feature of their service). Victim Support also operates in every criminal court in England and Wales.
    Support is available to any victim of crime in England and Wales regardless of nationality and any victims affected by crime abroad if they self refer. Victim Support provides different types of support, namely: practical, psychological, social, emotional, assistance to apply for compensation, information on victims’ rights and national criminal justice system.
    A victim may contact the Organisation through their hotline, go personally to a local scheme, by e-mail, letter, through police or third parties referral. Accordingly, Victim Support services are held through diverse means: telephone (in English, Welsh or other as available), face-to-face, letter, e-mail, text message and social networks.

    Leaflet in Welsh

    Leaflet in English

    Members

  • Victim Support Foundation (VSF Russia)

    Full

    14 Bolshoi Vlasievsky pereulok, Bldg. 1, Moscow 119002

    (+7 499) 241-37-33

    info@fondpp.org

    http://soprotivlenie.org/

    Victim Support Foundation (VSF Russia) provides free legal aid and psychological support to victims and witnesses of crime. Victims usually contact the Organisation through its hotline (+7 495 781 96 02), by letter or going personally to a local scheme. Support is provided through diverse means such as: telephone, live and/or on-line consulting and letter.
    Soprotivlenie strengths are their work advocating victims and witnesses rights, having developed the concept of governmental support to victims of crime in Russia. The organisation also provides expert opinion on legal documents drafting and lobbying of amendments to the existing law provisions.

    Leaflet in Russian

    Members

  • Victim Support Malta

    Full

    Victim Support Malta’s strength is the fact that, although small, their staff has expertise in different areas making it easier for them to provide a number of different services and implement various activities. Their strong links with other state and non-governmental organisations ensures that they provide an effective service without duplicating resources.
    The Organisation provides support to victims, witnesses, their friends and families, partners, husband/wives, colleagues and other professionals working with victims. Victim Support Malta provides services to all kinds of victims, including those falling within specific groups such as elderly and victims of domestic violence.
    A victim usually contacts the Organisation through their hotline, e-mail or referred by the police or other agencies. Support is provided mainly through telephone, face-to-face or e-mail, being these services available in Maltese and English. There are different types of support from which a victim of crime may benefit: practical, emotional, psychological, social, legal, assistance to apply for compensation, information on victims’ rights and national criminal justice system. Victim Support Malta also liaises with other NGO’s who provide additional services, such as shelter.
    Check their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/victimsupportmalta/ and/or follow VSM on Twitter @VictimSupportMT

    Leaflet in Maltese

    Members

  • Victim Support Northern Ireland

    Full
  • Victim Support Scotland

    Full

    Victim Support Scotland (VSS) is the largest organisation providing generic support services to victims and witnesses of crime in Scotland. Victim Services are based in every local authority and Witness Services are located in every Sherriff and High Court to ensure support and information services across the whole of Scotland. The individual needs of each victim/witness are assessed during the person’s first contact with Victim Support Scotland through their specifically developed Assessment Framework to ensure any support services are tailored to the person’s individual needs.
    The Organisation also has a very good working relationship with the Scottish Police and in some areas automated referrals between the police and Victim Support Scotland has been introduced. VSS is in the process of developing a national referral arrangement covering the whole of Scotland. Victim Support Scotland is a very strong advocating organisation, commenting on legislative proposals, influencing public policy and working regularly with the Parliament, Government and any other agency to promote and advance the rights of victims and witnesses of crime.
    Victim Support Scotland offers support services to “all people affected by crime” so anyone who feels impacted by crime can access the VSS service, there are no strict eligibility criteria or definition. Victims/witnesses usually contact VSS through the hotline, go personally to a local scheme, by e-mail, police referral (90% of victims are referred by police) and self-referral section on VSS website. VSS uses an external language service so that, with prior arrangements, can offer simultaneous translations into any required languages.

    Leaflet in English

    Members

  • Victimology Society of Serbia

    Associate

    Victimology Society of Serbia provides victim support services to victims and witnesses of crime, their families, friends, partners, husband/wives and colleagues. There are different types of support available, namely: practical, legal, emotional, information on victims’ rights and national criminal justice system. Victimology Society of Serbia also provides support to specific groups of victims such as elderly people, persons with disabilities, victims of hate crimes and mobbing.
    A victim or witness usually contacts the Organisation through letter, e-mail or going personally to a local scheme. Hence, services are provided through telephone, face-to-face, e-mail or letter.

    Leaflet in Serbian

    Members

  • Victims of Crime Office

    Associate
  • Victims’ Rights Alliance

    Associate

    The VRA is an Alliance of victim support and human rights organisations in Ireland namely, Advocates for Victims of Homicide [AdVIC],the CARI Foundation,the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre [DRCC],the Gay & Lesbian Equality Network [GLEN], the Immigrant Council of Ireland, Inclusion Ireland,the Irish Criminal Justice Disability Network [ICJDN] the Irish Council for Civil Liberties [ICCL], the Irish Road Victims’ Association [IRVA], the National Women’s Council of Ireland [NWCI] the Irish Tourist Assistance Service [ITAS], One in Four,the Rape Crisis Network Ireland [RCNI], Ruhama, Safe Ireland and Support after Homicide [SAH]. The Alliance was formed with one key goal: to ensure the Victims’ Rights Directive is implemented in Ireland within the proposed time frame, with all victims of crime in mind.

    The VRA was launched by the then Minister for Justice Alan Shatter on the 15th of November 2013. This date was chosen as it marked a two year countdown to the implementation of the Directive. Since that date many more organisations have joined the VRA and many more organisations have expressed an interest in becoming members.